Wednesday, June 19, 2024
HomeContractorsDevelopment phase begins for Weeneebayko Health Authority construction project

Development phase begins for Weeneebayko Health Authority construction project

 

Ontario Construction News staff writer

Pomerleau Inc. has started the development phase for the Weeneebayko Area Health Authority (WAHA) construction project.

Infrastructure Ontario (IO) and WAHA signed an agreement with Pomerleau Inc. after extensive evaluations following an open, fair and competitive request for proposals process that began in January 2022. The Pomerleau team includes:

  • Applicant leads: Pomerleau Inc.
  • Design team: Kasian Architects Ontario Inc. and Bertrand Wheeler Architecture Inc.
  • Construction team: Pomerleau Inc.
  • Financial advisor: PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP

The WAHA redevelopment project is being delivered using a progressive public-private partnership (P3) approach which fosters collaborative development of project requirements, design, pricing and risk management.

Pomerleau Inc. will work with IO and WAHA under the Development Phase Agreement, as well as with the Ministry of Health and Indigenous Services Canada, to continue to define the project requirements to advance the design and fixed confirm pricing. Parties will then have the option to sign a P3 Project Agreement and proceed to the construction phase, which is expected to begin in 2024.

The project is located in Moosonee and Moose Factory Island and the contract value will be announced following financial close.

Weeneebayko Area Health Authority (WAHA) provides vital healthcare services to people living along Ontario’s James Bay and Hudson Bay coasts, many of whom are of Cree lineage.

The WAHA redevelopment project involves the construction of a new hospital, Elder Care Lodge, visitor hostel and staff accommodations in Moosonee and a new Ambulatory Care Centre on Moose Factory Island. Once complete, these modern facilities will support WAHA in providing exceptional, culturally sensitive healthcare to patients and clients living along Ontario’s James Bay and Hudson Bay coasts, many of whom are Indigenous.

 

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