Sudbury architects recall achievements

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Sudbury architects recall achievements

NOCN staff writer

Long-established Sudbury architects Oryst Sawchuk and Arthur Peach traveled to Ottawa for the Ontario Association of Architects (OAA) convention in May and reminisced about their successes and memories at a lunch with Sudbury Living managing editor Vicki Gilhula and Mark Buckshon, president of the Construction News and Report Group of Companies, which publishes Northern Ontario Construction News (NOCN).

The three Sudbury residents, whom Buckshon met by accident, all knew former NOCN associate publisher Lynne Reynolds, both for her support of development issues while a Sudbury city councillor and because she has contributed freelance articles to Northern Living magazine.

The Sawchuk Peach Associates practice has operated since 1957, built on a relationship when the two then-young founding partners attended architecture school at the University of Manitoba in Winnipeg in the mid-50s.

The architects say their most satisfying projects have included work on the municipal bus terminal. They’ve experienced ups and downs, boom and bust, and the challenge of operating a small practice – keeping in touch with their community while working on challenging and innovative projects.

“The firm has undertaken a wide range of projects for both government and private clients: official plans; secondary plans and zoning by-laws; development plans and community studies; institutional, educational, apartment housing, commercial and mixed use development; project planning and analysis; subdivision design, and other aspects of urban and community planning and development,” the Sawchuk Peach website says.

“While the firm has prepared studies for areas throughout Ontario and outside the province, it is Sudbury based. Its principals and associates fully appreciate the particular community development problems associated with northern Ontario, the resource based economy and the pre-cambrian shield.

“Architecture and planning serve to solve community problems and help achieve a better living and working environment. While both require technical expertise, they also require an understanding of the social, economic and cultural characteristics of the community. For effective implementation, the planning and design process must be integrated with decision making to assure appropriate action.”

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